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Over the Edge of the World by Laurence Bergreen

Over the Edge of the World: Magellan’s Terrifying Circumnavigation of the Globe

2003, William Morrow and Company

We2 bookclub rating: Two thumbs up


We have to admire Magellan’s ambition: No matter the odds (and they were exceptionally long), he never gave up on his dream of circling the globe. He was a true explorer. He eventually found what is now known as the Strait of Magellan (a shortcut from the Atlantic Ocean to the Pacific), and his excursion ultimately proved the Earth was round. But the voyage was hellish. He and his crew endured terrible storms, attacks, starvation, scurvy, mutiny, and more. Magellan himself resorted to torture and violence. (We now have a graphic understanding of a “Spanish Inquisition.”) We have to wonder if Magellan was mentally healthy. Some theorize he was manic-depressive. Overall, this book is a fascinating depiction of one of the most significant events in history. And, fun fact: Although most people think that Magellan circumnavigated the globe, he really didn’t. He was killed before completing the journey. One of the five original ships and its crew completed the journey.

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yvonnelemonnier
yvonnelemonnier
18 de mar. de 2021

I knew about Magellan dying before the end of the circumnavigation of the globe--wasn't it while trying to convert some of the local population?


Speaking of scurvy, I also just learned the other day about why the English are called "limeys". Duh!


I always liked Drake better (kids like pirates!), even if he was a real sh*t to the Irish.


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Kat Becker
Kat Becker
11 de mar. de 2021

Since I was a kid, Magellan was and is my favorite explorer. I’m intrigued about the book, but dont care for too much violence and suffering. i liked reading your review and will consider reading it myself!

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kelliebooksblog
kelliebooksblog
11 de mar. de 2021
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It's so nice to have commenters and participators like you!

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